Have you ever regretted converting to Judaism?

Summary

In the following, the biographical evaluations of a total of 37 people are presented who were persecuted between 1933 and 1945 because they belonged to an alleged Jewish race ’. The persecuted contrast in the degree of persecution between ‘full Jew’ and mixed race 2nd degree ’; they were born between 1863 and 1944. These include people whose parents both had the same denomination as themselves, others for whom this only applied to one parent, and those whose parents both belonged to a different religious community than they themselves. The interview partners' families include members of the Jewish, Protestant, Roman Catholic and Muslim religious or denominational communities, as well as non-denominational people and a member of the Quaker community. Persecuted people are represented who never changed their religion, as well as those who converted before, during or after the Nazi era. Four generations of some families could be traced, of others only two. The study includes people with no educational qualifications and those who have completed their habilitation. Unemployed workers, workers, employees, civil servants, medium-sized entrepreneurs, lawyers, professors and members of the Reichstag are taken into account. People from large Protestant cities are represented as well as people from mixed Protestant-Catholic cities and small Catholic towns. Many of the persecuted remained in Germany for the rest of their lives, some of the persecuted emigrated and some re-emigrated. They lived in the following countries (regions): Australia, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Switzerland, South America, Turkey, England and the United States. Some were always German, others changed citizenship. Some served in the German Wehrmacht, others in an Allied army, and some were allied prisoners of war. Some have two persecuted parents, while others have only one persecuted parent. Some were in an extermination camp, some in another concentration camp, in labor camps or in the underground. A persecuted man was interned in England while his family was murdered in a German camp. The series of different fates could be continued.

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Copyright information

© Leske + Budrich, Opladen 1996

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