What is the best Norwegian punk band

NORWEGIAN HARDCORE / PUNK IN THE Eighties (PART 1)

part One

THE ORIGINS OF THE BANDS

It seems like the number of punk and hardcore bands in Europe during the 1980s was overwhelming. Punk conveyed that you didn't need a degree in music to play this type of music because it was simple and straightforward. The motivation for many bands was to express their anger and aggressiveness loudly and directly. Music and lyrics became our way of protesting the shit that was going on around us. Of course there were also bands that were more interested in fun or celebrated alcohol. But in most cases the reasons that led punks to form their own bands and get active were the negative state of society, as well as the political conditions and trends. During the early 1980s, most of the young punk and hardcore bands were barely able to play shows as there were almost all commercial clubs. Therefore, the band members and numerous other people from the scene built their own infrastructure, which made it possible to organize hardcore punk shows and to play self-organized tours, which led to an intensive exchange with similarly thinking people in other cities and regions or Countries led. Many friendships in various European punk scenes that arose during this time continue to this day. So I asked some members of defunct or still active Norwegian bands about their beginnings in the early eighties.

Jens-Petter Wiig, ANGOR WAT


ANGOR WAT started in 1981. Apart from our guitarist, nobody had played in a band or even any instrument before. I bought my drums two days before our first rehearsal while our guitarist had a homemade guitar with only five strings. We asked a friend of ours to make an amplifier for our singer. There was no destination at all, we just wanted to see if we could make music together. Before our first rehearsal we decided to learn "A look at tomorrow" from DISCHARGE and that was the first song we played. DISCHARGE were very important because they sounded like something we could play. The early punk bands like CLASH, SEX PISTOLS, DAMNED, RUTS and so on were initially way too good musicians for us to relate to.

Gunnar Nuven, SVART FRAMTID, KAFKA PROSESS, SO MUCH HATE

We wanted to achieve something with the band. On the one hand, we wanted to first establish our lifestyle and also ensure that there was a place for us in society. And then of course it was the style of music that we liked. And of course we also wanted to achieve something politically. It must have been 1983 when we founded SVART FRAMTID. In the beginning it was all quite difficult because we didn't have our own rehearsal room. That's why we always sneaked into some other rehearsal room. In any case, it took a while for SVART FRAMTID to become a serious band. With SVART FRAMTID we released a single on our own label X-Port Plater. Then there was a cassette with four songs. We didn't bring in more. After that the band broke up. One part of the band wanted to be more serious about the whole thing, while the other part wanted to be more serious about drinking. At some point our bass player Nils and I got fed up. The problems dragged on over a longer period of time, we just didn't feel like it anymore.

In 1985 we continued with KAFKA PROSESS. That was Nils on guitar, Fridtjof on bass and Thomas, who had previously played at BANNLYST, on drums. Publishing the split LP with DISORDER almost went without saying thanks to our good friendship. We had played concerts with DISORDER in England and then several times with them in Norway. Sometimes some people from DISORDER didn't make it back to England. Then they were half-Norwegians. The reason for the breakup of KAFKA PROSESS were musical differences within the band. Some in the band tended to prefer the melodic side while I would have liked to go a faster direction. At that time, Nils was already starting to play with the RAGA ROCKERS, who soon got really big in Norway. Nils and I managed almost everything for the band and after playing that last show in Copenhagen we knew for sure that when we got home we would split up as a band.

In 1987 SO MUCH HATE were founded. That was already planned before the end of KAFKA PROSESS because it was clear that the people from BANNLYST would move from Molde to Oslo. After that it quickly became clear that they would quit as a band and then we would do something together. First Per-Arne came and then Börre and Finn-Erik. So it wasn't that KAFKA PROSESS broke up because of SO MUCH HATE. The end would have come anyway, as we musically diverged and we had different opinions on how to proceed. It just didn't work anymore. That's why it was a rather unspectacular transition back then.

Roger Andreassen, BARN AV REGNBUEN, LIFE ... BUT HOW TO LIVE IT?

With LIFE ... BUT HOW TO LIVE IT? it started in a kind of accident in Oslo in the summer of 1988. Me and my brother Tom had played together in a hardcore band called BARN AV REGNBUEN for a number of years. It was a pretty extreme sounding band compared to the sound of most groups back then. Quite strongly influenced by HÜSKER DÜ's “Land Speed ​​Record” and hated in our hometown Harstad in the far north of Norway. We had played a few gigs in Oslo and got along well with the scene there, so we decided to move south. However, our drummer was only 14 years old at the time, so he stayed behind to finish school. Looking for a new drummer, we tried playing with a few other people and found Dyret, who is also from northern Norway. We were a good match both socially and musically, but his drum style didn't sound like the BARN AV REGNBUEN drummer at all.

That was the beginning of something new. Since the music we made with Dyret sounded a lot slower and more melodic than we were used to from BARN AV REGNBUEN, the old singing style, which was more of a scream, didn't fit in with it either. We needed a singer. I noticed Katja when she was working in the lightning squat in the café. She was young, angry, and had an intense charisma that immediately caught attention. There was no way to ignore it. You loved her or you hated her. I asked her to come for a rehearsal so she could see what we were up to and it turned out that she just had a natural talent for punk rock singing. We were a band! Katja Benneche Osvold - vocals; Roger Andreassen - guitar; Tom Andreassen - bass; Geir Petter Jensen aka Dyret - drums.

Frank Østrem, FADER WAR

We started the band because there was nothing for teenagers our age to do but hang out and get drunk. We had to take action ourselves to achieve something. We were influenced by the D.I.Y. movement and wanted to shout out our thoughts, our experiences with the system at the time and all the bad things that religion causes.

Finn-Erik Tangen, BANNLYST

BANNLYST was founded in 1982 in my hometown of Molde. Molde is a small town in Norway, in 1982 the population was around 20,000. I started playing in my first punk band in 1980/81. It was called NEVROSE and was basically a cover band that played songs from the early English and American punk bands. Neither of us had ever held an instrument before, and I got the job as a singer. We ended up writing a few songs of our own. There is a track by NEVROSE on the Norwegian compilation "Hurra For Norge - Norsk Pønk-Rock Vol. 5", it is called "Tvilsom frihet". Anyway, one day we were waiting in the rehearsal room when our guitarist showed up and told us that he suddenly found out that punk rock sucks and that he was leaving the band. That was the end of NEVROSE. We shared the rehearsal room with some other guys who had started a band just a few weeks earlier, and I decided to check them out. The boys had all played in punk bands. Bassist Per Arne Haugen was previously with drummer Geir Danielsen in the band STYGGE FØT, on guitar was Børre Løvik from the band SKABB. I went to them and told them that NEVROSE had broken up and the drummer said: "You are singing with us now." So I had no choice but to grab the microphone and scream.

About a year later the drummer left the band and was replaced by Thomas Fosseide from the band PSYKISK TERROR. A few years later Thomas played drums in bands like KAFKA PROSESS and STENGTE DØRER. The first time I can remember hearing about punk was when I saw a picture in a newspaper of a band that had played in Oslo the day before, on July 20, 1977. The band was the SEX PISTOLS and that was something I had never seen before. I thought, what the hell is this here ?! It was the whole demeanor of the guys in the band, one of them just wearing his leopard panties and splattering the journalists with beer. That was a time when bands like SMOKIE and BONEY M were popular in Norway - but that was ... different. It wasn't until a few years later that I finally got a tape of Never Mind The Bollocks from a classmate who bought it and hated it. When I remembered the picture I saw in the newspaper, I bought it from him and went home to hear it for the first time. And it totally blew me away. I loved it instantly and it was like an addiction I can't describe any other way. For me that was the reason to get into punk rock and finally to play in a band myself.

Another big influence was a band from Molde called ANFALL. Her guitarist Anders Eide later moved to Oslo and then played for SVART FRAMTID. Sir were quite young and played covers of early punk bands. And they were just brilliant. It was about the first concerts I've ever seen, and I was very impressed. So we thought maybe we can do that too. So the main motivation for starting a band back then was that we wanted to be part of this new movement because it was so full of energy and offered an alternative to the dreary normality of everyday life. Of course, 99.99% of people at school and at home were already claiming that punk rock was dead - it said the paper - and that if you wasted your time on it, you'd be basically a fucking idiot. Well, they were the idiots because they missed something.

Kjartan Kristiansen, WANNSKRAEKK

We started sometime in the spring of 1978. There was a party and someone had brought the DAMNED album and when I heard that noise I just knew my life would never be the same. We started making plans that night. The next day I called the singer in the cover band I had been in for a couple of years and told him something had happened and there was this thing called punk rock and I had to leave the band because real bands have their own songs write. Before that, I had no idea about punk rock. I lived in the third city south of the North Pole, and my friends and I were bored to death, so the discovery of "Dress up whatever you want and play loud, fast, and obnoxious music" was very welcome. Being in a band and having the “us against them” feeling was the only reward.

Viggo Mastad, ANGOR WAT, ISRAELVIS

ISRAELVIS were an extension of ANGOR WAT. After a few line-up changes, it became clear to us at ANGOR WAT that it was time for a fresh start, as both the band members and the musical influences had changed over the years. The band's roots were still very much in punk rock and the independent music scene, but ISRAELVIS never wanted to limit itself to one particular style of music. The main reason to be in a band was the same it always has been: the opportunity to express ideas through music and words, and promote the D.I.Y.idea through recordings and touring.



INFLUENCES

No one can seriously claim that they were not impressed in one way or another by any particular band or individual when they were young. But what influenced the different bands in Norway? How did it feel to start a band in the eighties? What were the things that were important for the band members back then?

Roger Andreassen, LIFE ... BUT HOW TO LIVE IT?


I guess you could say we had lyrics on a lot of different subjects, both political and inspired by human relationships, so more on a more personal level. After a while it became important for me and Katja to write texts that could be interpreted differently depending on the listener. Most of the time this was done on purpose, but from time to time people would come up to me and ask me to explain parts of texts that meant something completely different to them. I think that's a great thing. One-dimensional texts die quickly. When they mean different things to different people, they stay alive. Wow I guess we are poets haha!

Kjartan Kristiansen, WANNSKRAEKK

Since I was 15 years old at the time and never anywhere without mom and dad, I think that my influences have little to do with the band. Up until this THE DAMNED experience I was listening to the ROLLING STONES, Alex Harvey, NAZARETH, DEEP PURPLE, but then we discovered Stiff Records and the countless bands that are popping up in England. Too many to mention and most of them only made a single record. We were very open and influenced by all the noise that was made in the late seventies, early eighties, from SEX PISTOLS to THE CURE to CRASS back to JOHNNY MOPED, ONLY ONES, Iggy Pop, RAMONES, BLONDIE ... the list is endless!

Finn-Erik Tangen, BANNLYST

In the past, punk influences were not easy to find, because the record stores in Molde weren't exactly stocked with punk rock records. If you were lucky, you would find something from RAMONES, SHAM 69 or BUZZZCOCKS. I bought this English magazine called Sounds. There used to be little ads in it for indie record stores / labels like Small Wonder and Rough Trade, and we basically bought everything with a band name that sounded like a punk band might be hiding behind it. Of the Norwegian bands, I have to mention the "Spontan Abort" -7 "by BETONG HYSTERIA. It came out in early 1982 and was definitely very important to me. But otherwise around 1982 we were mainly influenced by the English and early American bands such as DISCHARGE, BLACK FLAG, CRASS, HÜSKER DÜ, "Hardcore 81" by D.O.A. and the first LP from MDC. I still remember hearing the first BAD BRAINS cassette at that time. But there are so many bands that I can't really say whether this or that record influenced me more than others, for me it was more the whole punk / DIY thing that made me write music and lyrics myself .

We really wanted to play and be a part of punk rock, but we wanted to make a sound that was ours and not like another band's copy. That was very important to us at BANNLYST back then. We didn't want any rules when we made music. The bands we liked the most were the ones whose sound was kind of unique. Others have to judge whether we have succeeded in doing this ourselves. I can still remember BANNLYST being criticized back then for having too many guitar solos, I mean, what the fuck? If you don't like it, don't listen. In my opinion, punk rock should mean doing anything you want. Fuck the rules! Rules are the enemy of creativity. The most important thing for us as friends and allies was to get something going together, whether we were making music or setting up the practice room, published fanzines or organized gigs, for about 13 paying spectators, like at the 1984 BANNYLYST and ANGOR WAT concert in Molde. But we didn't care, we had the best time of our lives.

Jens-Petter Wiig, ANGOR WAT

It was 1981 so our main influence was hardcore and especially DISCHARGE, although we never sounded like that ourselves. But we listened to a lot of other stuff, including non-punk stuff. I guess our favorite bands back then were DISCHARGE, CRASS, BIRTHDAY PARTY, KILLING JOKE, RUDIMENTARY PENI, RESIDENTS and EINSTÜRZENDE NEUBAUTEN.

Viggo Mastad, ISRAELVIS

There is a long line of musical influences starting in the early seventies, which includes the full history of punk and new wave. Most important to us was probably the anarchopunk scene and especially the records from CRASS. This was very evident at ANGOR WAT, but it is also an essential part of the background to ISRAELVIS.At the time when ISRAELVIS started in the late eighties and early nineties, we saw a lot of bands that played a sometimes more, sometimes less exciting mix of punk and metal, but also others who used the available technology such as samplers and sequencers served. So you could say that bands like VOIVOD, PRONG, MELVINS and even MINISTRY, PRODIGY or YOUNG GODS have influenced our style of music. At the same time, it was important to us to be part of the independent music scene. To explain that, I could add that punk has always been so much more to us than just playing a certain type of song or playing guitar and drums. It meant and still means to develop the musical and lyrical expression further, to be open to new musical ideas and to combine different styles and genres. In this way, ISRAELVIS not only reached die-hard punk purists, but also an audience that was open to this almost experimental approach.

Frank Østrem, FADER WAR

Back then, CRASS and DISCHARGE were our musical and human role models. D.I.Y., vegetarianism, being against war, violence and religion, these were the main influences on the way we lived.

THE HOME TOWNS

The activities of the European hardcore punk scene expanded rapidly in the mid-1980s. The interest in bands, fanzines and record companies spread like a virus in the cities of Europe. Berlin, Milan, Hamburg, Amsterdam, Turin, Oslo, Copenhagen, Pisa or Nottingham had great appeal, so it became common practice to travel to these cities. No matter where you went, even if you didn't know anyone, there was always a strong sense of togetherness. It was exhilarating to discover that there were punks all over Europe who thought, felt, drank and loved the same way you did. A trip to other cities or countries to meet fellow punks and bands was for many of them a special highlight for us. It was very easy to get in touch with other people in order to be friends. It was like a precursor to social networks, decades before the computer age.

The hospitality was great. This type of travel made it possible for us to see other cities and countries in a cost-effective manner, and we were often "adopted" by the families we lived with. In the summer of 1983, a cheap Interrail ticket allowed me to visit friends all over Germany, and in 1984 I extended the radius of my trips to various Western European countries. Actually, I've never done a lot of sightseeing tours, but I was able to go to concerts or stay in a lot of cool squats and concert halls where I met a huge amount of interesting people and bands. But what was life like in the cities and regions of Norway? Which squats or concert halls were important, which bands played there?

Kjartan Kristiansen, WANNSKRAEKK


Trondheim was probably one of the boring cities in the western hemisphere in 1978. But there was a place called Hard Rock Kafé / Trondheim Rockklubb and a film club. There was also a university and several thousand students with their own accommodation in the city. That really helped. Bands from all over the world came and played in the student house and local bands also got a performance there. That was before "punk" became such a sectarian thing. We had no idea what was fashionable right now, but it was places for the underdogs to hang out.

Gunnar Nuven, SVART FRAMTID, KAFKA PROSESS, SO MUCH HATE

Well, there wasn't much more than Oslo and Trondheim. Sometimes something was still possible in Bergen. I think the scene in Oslo was a little different from other cities because so many people had moved to Oslo from other parts of Norway. Many of them had already been active in their hometowns before, so that in Oslo many creative people came together in one place. There were also a number of punk rock bands, among the first were BETONG HYSTERIA or WANNSKRAEKK from Trondheim. There were also a lot of bands, but they were more of a flash in the pan. That was because the infrastructure at the time was so bad that there were problems with the rehearsal rooms and equipment. That was also the time when my life was pretty rough, with squatting and all sorts of other problems with the police and other people. This lifestyle was not entirely without it.

Frank Østrem, FADER WAR

We came from the city of Bergen on the west coast of Norway. The scene was very small. There were only about three or four bands there at that time, in 1980, and we were all bullied and beaten up by people who didn't like the way we looked.

Jens-Petter Wiig, ANGOR WAT

We lived in Trondheim, where there was an occupied house called Uffa at almost the same time we started as a band. We soon had our rehearsal room there and it was an important center where we did gigs and organized political activities by creating a label and a fanzine. An alternative cultural scene developed in Trondheim in the 1970s and the hippies were part of it too. There was also an art school that opened up to the punk movement in the late seventies and early eighties. For this reason, some of the bands were a bit more experimental, because we thought that punk should always dare to do something different and not always sound the same.

Viggo Mastad, ISRAELVIS

In Trondheim, with Uffa, we had an autonomous youth center based on the same ideas as the Blitz in Oslo and numerous other squats across Europe. Uffa meant everything to us. There we met, we rehearsed there and played a lot of gigs, there we organized concerts for other bands. We were involved in running the Uffa bookstore, where we also sold records, tapes, fanzines, books and so on. Ultimately, the punk scene in Trondheim in the eighties and early nineties was to be equated with Uffa. A number of bands have developed in this environment and hundreds of bands from Norway and all over Europe have come to play there.

Finn-Erik Tangen, BANNLYST

By the time BANNLYST started playing there were about fifteen to twenty punk people in Molde, so it wasn't that huge. Some of the Molde punks had already moved to Oslo and the scene was smaller than it was in the early 1980s. Another important band back then was PSYKISK TERROR. You were involved with a track on the "Nå Eller Aldri" compilation EP. Actually no punk bands from outside came to Molde until we came into contact with ANGOR WAT from Trondheim. We organized her appearance in a youth club that was part of Kulturelt Alternative. We had our rehearsal room in the back of the building. In 1982 there was an occupied house in Molde for a short time, but unfortunately we were kicked out again, so we had to hang around in our rehearsal room the whole time.

SQUATS, AUTONOMOUS CENTERS, LEFT CULTURAL CENTERS

An important feature of left culture is the establishment and maintenance of D.I.Y. and open spaces. The origins of the hood occupation scene go back to the early 1970s. The early squatters mainly focused on finding their own apartments and rooms for alternative lifestyles. It was during this period that many of the independent centers that still exist today came into being. Thus the hippies prepared the ground for the free spaces that were later used by the punks, although many punks hated the hippies. Unlike the early days of the squatter scene, nowadays it's all about maintaining squats or autonomous centers where one can attend any kind of social and cultural alternative events.

The history of the origins of each individual house testifies to the incomparable energy and imagination of the people involved. It's mostly about self-management. In addition, elementary needs could be realized and satisfied. In these self-managed houses there was and is space for a multitude of activities: cafes and bars were set up, there were also rooms that were used by various political groups, as well as practice rooms for the bands. Other groups could have their own parties or alternative theatrical performances. The premises were also used for creative work, such as screen printing and printmaking, wood carving or other art. In addition, many of these houses had their own info shops selling left-wing literature.

As an example, I would like to quote an excerpt from the self-declaration of the JuZi in Göttingen: “The unifying element is a refusal to accept the uniformity oriented towards money and usability - the range of opinions and styles is diverse, controversial and not always easy. The JuZi Göttingen sees itself as anti-fascist and anti-sexist. It claims to intervene in political issues - which sometimes works better and sometimes less well. The JuZi was and is in a controversial relationship to the prevailing politics. ”The Norwegian squats and centers often pursued similar strategies, so I would like to hear from the bands what significance these places had for them.

Jens-Petter Wiig, ANGOR WAT


There were two important squats in Norway at the time: one in Trondheim and the Blitz in Oslo. In the late 1980s there were also some youth centers similar to the German AJZs, and these were the places where the more alternative bands could perform. As for the “Blitz Route”, the Europe-wide contacts of the Blitz, it was mainly used by Oslo bands, most of whom had a close connection to the Blitz. The most important thing was that it gave the bands ties to play all over Europe. As for ANGOR WAT, our contacts arose from doing a fanzine and writing letters all over the world. In 1984 we released a split cassette with BANNYLIST on our own label Knall Syndikatet, so Tim from the Bristol label Children Of The Revolution contacted us and asked us to release the tape on vinyl. We said no and instead recorded new material for him, the General Strike LP. Through him and our other contacts, especially the British anarcho band POISON GIRLS, which we knew well, we were able to do a UK tour in 1985 with DIRT, SUBHUMANS, ANTISECT, POISON GIRLS and others.

Frank Østrem, FADER WAR

There was a squat in Baneveien at the time. At that time there were no autonomous youth centers in Bergen. We never had contact with the "Blitz Route" out of aversion to their political and violent behavior.

Roger Andreassen, LIFE ... BUT HOW TO LIVE IT?

The lightning squat was very important for the political faction of the Oslo punk scene. So politically far left. Members of LIFE ... BUT HOW TO LIVE IT ?, SO MUCH HATE, STENGTE DØRER, KAFKA PROSESS and other bands worked and rehearsed there. We were more or less one of the “house bands” there. Me and Tom also helped found the Info / Recordshop in 1989. Back then it was hardly possible to get punk rock / hardcore records in Norway. We had a record store that was open six days a week, and we even ran a mailorder that supplied the rest of the country with good music. I think that had a big impact on the Norwegian scene back then. For more than thirty years, the Blitz has also regularly hosted D.I.Y. concerts by domestic and foreign bands. That’s something! Some parts of the Oslo punk scene had a problem with the Blitz due to the political nature of the house. But what can I say, that was their problem.

Gunnar Nuven, SVART FRAMTID, KAFKA PROSESS, SO MUCH HATE

There was nothing else outside of Oslo. And if there was, there was only one evening when people did projects. No other houses were active for a long period of time. Blitz was the heart and soul of the punk rock scene in Norway. Back then there was a mix there that was totally perfect. The lightning bolt has been the focus of my life as well as my whole lifestyle for years. That had a pretty big impact on my life back then. If this scene hadn't existed, I would probably never get to know all of these people who were involved. It was probably the crucial point that in principle, as a label and band, you had the chance to do something. That would not have been possible any other, normal way.

Kjartan Kristiansen, WANNSKRAEKK

In 1981 we were part of the group of people who occupied Kjøpmannsgata 28 in Trondheim City. That became the first Uffa house. Various bands played there in the first few days. We were there when the police tried to evacuate and couldn't. It was an electrifying feeling to be able to claim a room as our own and defend ourselves against the ignorant small town police and win. I'm sure the Blitz route meant a lot to a lot of bands, but not to us. I have a vague memory of playing there once, but we never went on tour like the later hardcore bands, we weren't a hardcore band either, just a loud rock band. We were connected to Uffa in a variety of ways, as it was our hometown and was run by people we knew, but we kind of lost interest once everything was organized and funded.

Finn-Erik Tangen, BANNLYST

In Norway there are two youth houses that turned out to be the most important squats in Norway, the Uffa in Trondheim from 1981 and the Blitz in Oslo from 1982. We first came into contact with the Uffa after we 83/84 the people from the Trondheim band ANGOR WAT and shortly afterwards they played in the Blitz in Oslo. In 2010 we received the shocking news that Uffa had burned to the ground, but the people of Trondheim have worked very hard in recent years and Uffa has now resurrected with a new house on the same property.

It is difficult to assess what influence these two houses have had on youth culture in Norway over the past 35 years. They are not just a point of contact for punks, but for all people who are looking for an alternative to the "normal" lifestyle. All people who did not want to put success and money at the center of their lives could find like-minded people there. For me and many others it was like coming home. And besides keeping the alternative music scene alive, they have a strong political and social agenda. As in many similar houses around the world, the fight against social injustice, racism, sexism and fascism is at the fore. There have been many other squats in Norway over the years, some survived and some not. Around the barricades in Oslo, one of Norway's best scenes has been established for over a decade. But last but not least, these are places where you can meet old friends and, with a bit of luck, make new friends. Friends with whom you can feel comfortable and with whom you can exchange ideas and thoughts and of course celebrate.

I think the Blitz route has been important to a lot of Norwegian bands over the years. The route has evolved over time, but I think it started when SVART FRAMTID performed at the Chaostage in Hanover in 1984. And through the BANNLYST mini-tour in England in 1985 and then in Germany in 1986, which were organized by Gunnar from SVART FRAMTID, X-Port Plater, KAFKA PROSESS, through the tour of SO MUCH HATE with IGNITION in 1988 and the tour with LIFE ... BUT HOW TO LIVE IT ?. In 1989 the Blitz route was complete and it worked. The foundation was laid and the network has grown to this day, thanks to the many other Norwegian punks who have done the same over the past 25 years. This has allowed bands from all over Norway to get involved in a project that has been and is still going on across Europe. Over the years the Norwegian bands have built a pretty good reputation in Europe, maybe in Germany too, which makes it easier to tour there, and people actually come to the shows. It has also resulted in bands we met along the way coming to Norway to play and hang out with us.

Viggo Mastad, ISRAELVIS

Uffa remained important in the Trondheim scene throughout the 1990s and beyond, with new generations of alternative-minded kids getting involved. The house was destroyed in a fire a few years ago but has been rebuilt and is still in use. In Trondheim, the Uffa scene has largely shifted to the so-called Svartlamon, a former working-class district that has been transformed into a district with alternative shops, cafes and inexpensive apartments. In Oslo, the lightning bolt is still a factor to be reckoned with, and it still works much the same as it did two decades ago. Many Norwegian bands have taken the lightning route over the years. Too many to list and there is no doubt that this opportunity to play overseas was very important to many bands.As a result, they were confronted with new environments and new ideas and gave them experiences with live concerts that you would otherwise never experience in a country like Norway, where the cities are small and far apart.

Translation and editing: Triebi Instabil

Continued in Ox # 139